Enrich News

Individual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy research study: Open and recruiting

The Individual Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (iCST) research study is currently open and recruiting participants (people living with dementia and their carers).

In recent years, cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) groups have been shown to be an enjoyable and beneficial therapy for people with dementia and are now a recommended treatment. More recently an individualised (one-on-one) version of CST (iCST) was developed, which is delivered by a carer (e.g. friend or family member) and involves taking part in a variety of activities such as being creative, word games and discussion of current affairs. The idea is to keep the mind active through enjoyable activities tailored to the interests and abilities of the person. A study showed iCST can improve the relationship between the person with dementia and the carer. 

As the next step, researchers are exploring a computerised version of iCST since technology is increasingly becoming a bigger part of our daily lives and regular use of technology can be beneficial. Rather than a paper-based manual, a computerised version could be used on a tablet (iPad).  Individuals will need access to an iPad for the duration of the study. They are interested in finding out whether a computerised version could be beneficial in improving cognition and quality of life for the person with dementia.

Anne Chafer, Clinical Studies Officer, is leading with this study and would welcome the opportunity to visit your care home to promote among your family group sessions.  If you would like Anne to visit you care home please contact Anne directly on anne.chafer@lpft.nhs.uk

For more information about the iCST programme, please visit the following website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/icst

author: Lakshini Mendis

Written by Lakshini Mendis on Tuesday November 20, 2018
Tags: cognitivestimulationtherapy, researchstudy, carehomeresearch

« Interested in sustainability in health and social care? - New resource: Managing Success in Dementia »