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TAKE PART IN A SURVEY

Health Data Research UK North (HDR UK) and NIHR Yorkshire and Humber invite you to register for our Care Homes Research Workshop.

This event will provide a platform for researchers, stakeholders and public and patient representatives from across the Care Home sector to come together and discuss the latest research within the field. The workshop will be split into two sessions; the first will include a panel discussing how to make research findings useable in care homes and a second session will discuss future research priorities in the sector.

Venue: INOX The University of Sheffield

Date: 20th October 2022

Time: 12:00 – 16:00

The order of the day is as follows:

12:00 – 12:45   Welcome Buffet Lunch

12:45 – 13:00   Introductions and Welcome by Professor Peter Bath and Carl Marincowitz

13:00 – 13:15    Liz Jones, Policy Director & Professor Julienne Meyer National Care Forum –  The view from the care home: benefits and challenges of research

13:40 – 13:55    Duncan Chambers University of Sheffield – Reducing unplanned hospital admissions from care homes: an updated and extended systematic review

13:55 – 14:25    Panel discussion and questions: Making research findings useable in care homes

14:25 – 14:45    Refreshments

14:45 – 15:00    Academic Health Science Network (Speaker TBC) – National work stream managing deterioration in care homes

15:00 – 15:15     Professor Suzanne Mason University of Sheffield – Evaluation of use Health Call app in care homes

15:15 – 15:30     Professor Karen Spilsbury & Peter Hodkinson (Chair of Leeds Care Association and Managing Director of Westward Care) – NICHE Leeds: A care and science partnership enhancing the quality in care homes

15:30 – 16:00    Panel discussion and questions: Future research priorities

16:00 – onwards  Refreshments and networking

 

Please register to join us by clicking here

Background

Care home staff play a crucial role in managing residents’ health and responding to deteriorations. When deciding whether to transfer a resident to hospital, a careful consideration of the potential benefits and risks is required. Previous studies have identified factors that influence staff decision-making, yet few have moved beyond description to produce a conceptual model of the decision-making process.

Objectives

To develop a conceptual model to describe care home staff’s decision-making when faced with a resident who potentially requires a transfer to the hospital.

Methods

Data collection occurred in England between May 2018 and November 2019, consisting of 28 semi-structured interviews with 30 members of care home staff across six care home sites and 113 hours of ethnographic observations, documentary analysis and informal conversations (with staff, residents, visiting families, friends and healthcare professionals) at three of these sites.

Results

A conceptual model of care home staff’s decision-making is presented. Except in situations that staff perceived to be urgent enough to require an immediate transfer, resident transfers tended to occur following a series of escalations. Care home staff made complex decisions in which they sought to balance a number of potential benefits and risks to: residents; staff (as decision-makers); social relationships; care home organisations and wider health and social care services.

Conclusions

During transfer decisions, care home staff make complex decisions in which they weigh up several forms of risk. The model presented offers a theoretical basis for interventions to support deteriorating care home residents and the staff responsible for their care.

If you would like to read this paper in its entirety please click here for free access 

How will dementia care develop and transform in the future? – be part of the conversation at Care Roadshows London as our brilliant panellists dive deep into the crucial challenges of dementia care 💚

Join the discussion with:

Jackie Pool, Dementia Care Champion at Quality Compliance Systems

Dr Kellyn Lee 💚, CEO and Founder of WISER Health and Social Care and Visiting Researcher at the University of Southampton

Dr Rosie Mead, CEO of Musica Music and Wellbeing CIC

Nula Suchet, Author of – The Longest Farewell: James, Dementia and Me

Rishi Jawaheer, Director of The Jawa Group, Namaste Care International & CareVision CMS.

 

Date: Tuesday 18th October 2022

Venue: Epsom Downs Racecourse

To register for your free ticket click here

“Research in social care is very important as it can inform social work practice and improve outcomes for people. The Kent Research Partnership is one of six capacity building, social care partnerships funded by the NIHR Health Services and Delivery (HS&DR) programme in England. Our four-year programme of work will develop sustainable Kent-based partnerships to support the delivery of high quality social care research on the topics that matter most in our region.

Kent County Council Adult Social Care, the University of Kent and partners are leading a project that aims to help build capacity and develop a positive culture of research.

Communities of Practice are a key aspect of this work as they enable people from all backgrounds to come together to discuss their shared area of interest, learn from each other and existing research, and develop tangible research projects about the topic which will have a real impact on practice.

Objectives of the Meeting:

This is the first meeting of our co-produced Community of Practice: “Enhancing, diversifying and sustaining social care workforce”. At this meeting, you will:

  • Build relationships with members of this Community, including people supported by adult social care, carers, and the health and social care workforce.
  • Build on discussions from the first meeting and hear from guest speakers about research related to social care recruitment and retention in Kent. This meeting’s topics include: issues care providers face, funding and the fair price for care, how the workforce influences quality of social care, and what affects recruitment and retention.
  • Learn more about how to get access to research-related activities, training, online resources and admin support available for you to be fully engaged in the Community.

Our Invited Speakers are:

Collette Thornton – Business Development Manager, Cartref Homes

Steve Allan – Senior Research Fellow, University of Kent

The speakers will talk about issues care providers face, how workforce influences social care quality, and recruitment & retention.

Who should attend:

  • Social care practitioners and managers
  • People who use social care
  • Family/friends who are carers for someone
  • Commissioners and providers of care
  • Researchers with an interest in social care

Date: 14 July, 12:30-14:00

IT and participation support:

If you would like some further help with using the virtual video meeting platform (Zoom) and the online collaboration platform (GlassCubes) please refer to the Community of Practice handbook or contact us and we would be happy to support you.

If there is anything we can do to make it easier for you to attend and participate, do not hesitate to let us know.

If you would like to get in touch or find out more, please contact us: KentResearchPartnership@kent.ac.”

Click here to register

“Research in social care is very important as it can inform social work practice and improve outcomes for people. The Kent Research Partnership is one of six capacity building, social care partnerships funded by the NIHR Health Services and Delivery (HS&DR) programme in England. Our four-year programme of work will develop sustainable Kent-based partnerships to support the delivery of high quality social care research on the topics that matter most in our region.

Kent County Council Adult Social Care, the University of Kent and partners are leading a project that aims to help build capacity and develop a positive culture of research.

Communities of Practice are a key aspect of this work as they enable people from all backgrounds to come together to discuss their shared area of interest, learn from each other and existing research, and develop tangible research projects about the topic which will have a real impact on practice.”

Objectives of the Meeting:

This is the second meeting of our co-produced Community of Practice: “Supporting people with complex needs throughout the lifespan”. At this meeting, you will:

  • Build relationships with members of this Community, including people supported by adult social care, carers, and the health and social care workforce.
  • Build on discussions from the first meeting and hear from guest speakers about research and practice improvement related to personalisation and direct payments.
  • Learn more about how to get access to research-related activities, training, online resources and admin support available for you to be fully engaged in the Community.

Date: Wed 27 July,  12:30-2pm 

Who should attend:

  • Social care practitioners and managers
  • People who use social care
  • Family/friends who are carers for someone
  • Commissioners and providers of care
  • Researchers with an interest in social care

IT and participation support:

If you would like some further help with using the virtual video meeting platform (Zoom) and the online collaboration platform (GlassCubes) please refer to the Community of Practice handbook or contact us and we would be happy to support you.

If there is anything we can do to make it easier for you to attend and participate, do not hesitate to let us know.

If you would like to get in touch or find out more, please contact us: KentResearchPartnership@kent.ac.uk”

To register for this event click here 

Continence, dementia, and care that preserves dignity

 “Dementia is a growing, global challenge. As populations age, it has become one of the most important issues facing health and care systems around the world. People living with dementia often have problems going to the toilet (continence problems) which can have a profound impact on their lives and on their carers’. There is a misconception that nothing can be done if a person living with dementia experiences episodes of incontinence of urine or faeces or both. In fact, continence can be promoted through activities and care practices, including a balanced diet, exercise, and a clear routine. Encouragement and help to use the toilet may involve ‘signposting’ the toilet and mobility aids. A growing range of products, including assistive technology, can help some people at some times. Even so, the progressive nature of dementia means that there will come a point where containment might be the best approach. In which case, carers and practitioners need support and advice to provide this intimate care in the best way possible.”

“This themed review, featuring NIHR-funded research, identifies the impact of continence problems on people living with dementia and their carers, as well as ways to improve continence care at home, in care homes and in hospitals.”

For more information on this topic you either read the report by clicking here or listen to our podcast by clicking here

ExCHANGE is a collaboration between organisations in Devon and the South West Peninsula concerned with the care and happiness of care home residents: PenARC; the University of Exeter; the Devon Care Homes Collaborative – a group of over 250 independent care providers committed to improving the lives of those living in their care through a programme of continual review and improvement and the South West Academic Health Science Network (SW AHSN).

“The ExCHANGE project is all about exchanging and mobilising knowledge between researchers and those working, living in and visiting care homes. Our collaboration is made up of researchers, care home providers and family members exploring ways to use research to improve care home practice. We’ve co-designed workshops for care staff about how to use evidence to inform their practice alongside workshops to help researchers make sense of care homes in their work. We want to breakdown long-standing academic hierarchies to get care home stakeholders and researchers working together on an equal footing, with the ultimate aim of enhancing quality of life in care homes.”

To inspire and encourage innovative future collaborations between academics and practitioners take a look at our project list and share as widely as possible.

“Together we can work towards producing critical and timely research to move us closer towards our shared goal of improving the health and wellbeing of those working, living in and visiting care homes.”

For more details click here 

Do you work in a care home for older people?

Researchers at the University of East Anglia are looking for any member of care-home staff (e.g., office, catering, ground/estates, care, manager) to take part in a survey about working during the pandemic.

This is a survey that is being conducted as part of the UCAIRE study, which explores how staff who work in older people’s care homes coped with preventing spread and transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in order to inform development of guidelines and support in managing future outbreaks of infectious diseases in care homes. The survey initially ran last autumn, and is now running again to gather longitudinal data and look at any changes in the interim.

Those who complete the survey will have the chance to win one of ten £10 Amazon e-vouchers, to be drawn at random when the survey closes.  The survey ends on 15 May 2022.  For more details, please click here

“The study focuses on the impacts of Covid-19 on care homes for older people. Uniquely, the research combines analysis of care home finances with voices from care staff about their experiences, to give a picture of how the sector has been affected financially during covid and the impact of policy interventions.

This independent study is led by experts in the field of health and social care at Warwick Business School and University College London. And it has the support of both UNISON and the National Care Forum as formal partners of the programme.

We have a strong policy focus and have secured additional funding from the University of Warwick to conduct policy impact activities. Policy expertise and networks are being mobilised by our project partner, independent thinktank the Centre for Health and the Public Interest.

We want to understand the perspectives of people working on the frontline during the pandemic. This is a valuable chance to contribute to the findings and inform the recommendations resulting from this important study, which will be shared with those who take decisions about the future of care home services. 

All staff at care homes for older people in the UK can join our 10-minute survey. 10 x £50 shopping vouchers to be won!”

To take part click here

 

“Margaret Butterworth Care Home Forum is a forum for discussion and learning focused on dementia care in communal settings such as nursing homes, care homes and extra care housing. There will be 3 webinars over the course of 2022. The first webinar on 23 March 2022, from 2.00-4.00 will focus on the theme ‘Visiting in care homes during Covid-19’.

Two speakers will discuss this topic:

Josie Dixon, Assistant Professorial Research Fellow, Care Policy and Evaluation Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science, will discuss the study Visit-id: a study of care home visiting arrangements during Covid-19

Dr Kathleen Lane, PI of UCAIRE study, University of East Anglia, will talk about the study titled “We can’t visit and see what’s going on for her… it’s like having paper-bags over our heads”: experiences of infection-control measures on family and friends of care-home residents during Covid-19

We will have plenty of time for questions and discussions. Once you have registered on Eventbrite, you will receive the Zoom-link a few days before the webinar.”

 

To register click here