Page Menu

Research findings

Site Menu

The role of
social care in
supporting

YOUNG
ADULT
CARERS

 

INDEX.PHP

TAKE PART IN A SURVEY

Health Data Research UK North (HDR UK) and NIHR Yorkshire and Humber invite you to register for our Care Homes Research Workshop.

This event will provide a platform for researchers, stakeholders and public and patient representatives from across the Care Home sector to come together and discuss the latest research within the field. The workshop will be split into two sessions; the first will include a panel discussing how to make research findings useable in care homes and a second session will discuss future research priorities in the sector.

Venue: INOX The University of Sheffield

Date: 20th October 2022

Time: 12:00 – 16:00

The order of the day is as follows:

12:00 – 12:45   Welcome Buffet Lunch

12:45 – 13:00   Introductions and Welcome by Professor Peter Bath and Carl Marincowitz

13:00 – 13:15    Liz Jones, Policy Director & Professor Julienne Meyer National Care Forum –  The view from the care home: benefits and challenges of research

13:40 – 13:55    Duncan Chambers University of Sheffield – Reducing unplanned hospital admissions from care homes: an updated and extended systematic review

13:55 – 14:25    Panel discussion and questions: Making research findings useable in care homes

14:25 – 14:45    Refreshments

14:45 – 15:00    Academic Health Science Network (Speaker TBC) – National work stream managing deterioration in care homes

15:00 – 15:15     Professor Suzanne Mason University of Sheffield – Evaluation of use Health Call app in care homes

15:15 – 15:30     Professor Karen Spilsbury & Peter Hodkinson (Chair of Leeds Care Association and Managing Director of Westward Care) – NICHE Leeds: A care and science partnership enhancing the quality in care homes

15:30 – 16:00    Panel discussion and questions: Future research priorities

16:00 – onwards  Refreshments and networking

 

Please register to join us by clicking here

Background

Care home staff play a crucial role in managing residents’ health and responding to deteriorations. When deciding whether to transfer a resident to hospital, a careful consideration of the potential benefits and risks is required. Previous studies have identified factors that influence staff decision-making, yet few have moved beyond description to produce a conceptual model of the decision-making process.

Objectives

To develop a conceptual model to describe care home staff’s decision-making when faced with a resident who potentially requires a transfer to the hospital.

Methods

Data collection occurred in England between May 2018 and November 2019, consisting of 28 semi-structured interviews with 30 members of care home staff across six care home sites and 113 hours of ethnographic observations, documentary analysis and informal conversations (with staff, residents, visiting families, friends and healthcare professionals) at three of these sites.

Results

A conceptual model of care home staff’s decision-making is presented. Except in situations that staff perceived to be urgent enough to require an immediate transfer, resident transfers tended to occur following a series of escalations. Care home staff made complex decisions in which they sought to balance a number of potential benefits and risks to: residents; staff (as decision-makers); social relationships; care home organisations and wider health and social care services.

Conclusions

During transfer decisions, care home staff make complex decisions in which they weigh up several forms of risk. The model presented offers a theoretical basis for interventions to support deteriorating care home residents and the staff responsible for their care.

If you would like to read this paper in its entirety please click here for free access 

How will dementia care develop and transform in the future? – be part of the conversation at Care Roadshows London as our brilliant panellists dive deep into the crucial challenges of dementia care 💚

Join the discussion with:

Jackie Pool, Dementia Care Champion at Quality Compliance Systems

Dr Kellyn Lee 💚, CEO and Founder of WISER Health and Social Care and Visiting Researcher at the University of Southampton

Dr Rosie Mead, CEO of Musica Music and Wellbeing CIC

Nula Suchet, Author of – The Longest Farewell: James, Dementia and Me

Rishi Jawaheer, Director of The Jawa Group, Namaste Care International & CareVision CMS.

 

Date: Tuesday 18th October 2022

Venue: Epsom Downs Racecourse

To register for your free ticket click here

Continence, dementia, and care that preserves dignity

 “Dementia is a growing, global challenge. As populations age, it has become one of the most important issues facing health and care systems around the world. People living with dementia often have problems going to the toilet (continence problems) which can have a profound impact on their lives and on their carers’. There is a misconception that nothing can be done if a person living with dementia experiences episodes of incontinence of urine or faeces or both. In fact, continence can be promoted through activities and care practices, including a balanced diet, exercise, and a clear routine. Encouragement and help to use the toilet may involve ‘signposting’ the toilet and mobility aids. A growing range of products, including assistive technology, can help some people at some times. Even so, the progressive nature of dementia means that there will come a point where containment might be the best approach. In which case, carers and practitioners need support and advice to provide this intimate care in the best way possible.”

“This themed review, featuring NIHR-funded research, identifies the impact of continence problems on people living with dementia and their carers, as well as ways to improve continence care at home, in care homes and in hospitals.”

For more information on this topic you either read the report by clicking here or listen to our podcast by clicking here

“Inspiring different teams to work together is key to the successful leadership of any integrated health and social care system (ICS). However, little is known about how effective leadership can be supported and improved.

In England, ICSs are bringing together local NHS services and working with social care systems, local authorities, communities, and other groups, each with their own motivations. Leaders of ICSs therefore may be managing several professional teams with different goals and accountabilities. The challenges are not the same as in managing a team of professionals working towards a single goal.

ICSs are being rolled out across the UK and will soon be the new model of healthcare delivery. They are designed to put the person at the centre of their care. But there is little research on how leadership works (the mechanisms of leadership), and what makes it successful.

Research into successful leadership in health and social care mostly focuses on single teams and their tasks. This new study explored leadership of complex integrated teams and systems across health and social care. Working with a range of service providers and users, carers and researchers, the team reviewed the published evidence. They identified 10 mechanisms (such as balancing different perspectives, or working appropriately with power) which could influence the success of ICS leadership.

The researchers then searched for papers which either did or did not support the importance of these mechanisms. This allowed them to describe the influence of these mechanisms on ICS leadership.

Overall, the researchers said there was a lack of evidence on ICS leadership. Most studies referred to simple models of leadership and did not explore more complex teams and systems. They generally assumed the necessary skills for leadership are the same. The researchers argue that this assumption is not valid and that more research is needed to understand how to successfully lead ICSs.”

To read more on this topic click here

This month, Foothold (IET Benevolent fund) are delighted to be joined by BPS chartered psychologist and dementia care researcher  Dr Kellyn Lee for 2 special webinars.

If you’re currently caring for someone with dementia, these expert webinars will help you cope with the extraordinary challenges dementia can bring, whilst improving the wellbeing of the people you care for.

May 19th 12:00 – 13:00

PART 1: Understanding the importance of everyday objects in dementia care – Material Citizenship

May 20th 12:00 – 13:00

PART 2: Supporting the wellbeing of families of people with dementia through the We Care – Dementia Care programme

Find out more in Dr Kellyn’s brand-new blog 

To book your place on one or both of these free webinars click here

 

Researchers from The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and The London School of Economics discuss whether the UK Government Really did throw a protective ring around care homes during the Covid-19 Pandemic.

The objectives of the study were to: “examine COVID-19 policies for care homes in England and to describe providers’ experiences of those policies in May and June 2020.”

The methods they used were: “Mixed methods including policy analysis and an anonymous online survey of English care home providers, recruited using webinars and WhatsApp groups about their experiences of funding, testing, PPE, isolation and staffing until the end of May and early June 2020.”

Their findings are:  “Although social care policies in England have aligned with those advised by the World Health Organization, they were arguably delayed and were not implemented effectively. Testing had taken place in 70% of care homes surveyed but only 36% of residents had been tested, of whom 16% were positive. Managers were unable to effectively implement isolation policies and reported that workforce and funding support did not always reach them. Guidance changed frequently and was conflicting and could not always be implemented, for example when personal protection equipment was extremely expensive and difficult to source.”

For full details of this paper click here

Researchers:

Selina Rajan, The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, GB

Adelina Comas-Herrera, The London School of Economics, GB

Martin Mckee. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, GB

“Margaret Butterworth Care Home Forum is a forum for discussion and learning focused on dementia care in communal settings such as nursing homes, care homes and extra care housing. There will be 3 webinars over the course of 2022. The first webinar on 23 March 2022, from 2.00-4.00 will focus on the theme ‘Visiting in care homes during Covid-19’.

Two speakers will discuss this topic:

Josie Dixon, Assistant Professorial Research Fellow, Care Policy and Evaluation Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science, will discuss the study Visit-id: a study of care home visiting arrangements during Covid-19

Dr Kathleen Lane, PI of UCAIRE study, University of East Anglia, will talk about the study titled “We can’t visit and see what’s going on for her… it’s like having paper-bags over our heads”: experiences of infection-control measures on family and friends of care-home residents during Covid-19

We will have plenty of time for questions and discussions. Once you have registered on Eventbrite, you will receive the Zoom-link a few days before the webinar.”

 

To register click here

 

“To mark the launch of the LTCcovid International Living Report on COVID-19 and Long-Term Care we are organising a two-day online workshop. Attendees will be able to join parts of the workshop.

The programme will include:

  • International overviews of the impacts of the pandemic on Long-Term Care systems, a discussion of lessons learnt and the policy reforms that are needed to strengthen Long-Term Care systems all over the world.
  • Findings from research projects on Long-Term Care and COVID-19

Details of the programme will be shared as we have them; for now, please email Adelina Comas-Herrera at a.comas@lse.ac.uk if you would like to present.”

The workshop is free to attend with pre-registration. Click here to register

“The MARQUE programme includes a range of techniques to help staff get to know residents’ interests, address their agitation, and improve communication. In the original study, researchers introduced the programme into 10 care homes.

In this study, researchers revisited 6 of the same care homes. They asked staff to look back at action plans they had drawn up two years earlier. The study found that all homes had continued with at least one intervention. Staff members felt their working lives and the culture of the home had improved as a result. Themes that emerged from interviews with staff were: improved communication, more respect for junior colleagues, and an increased willingness to try new strategies. They saw benefits both for themselves and for residents.

However, only one home was still using its full action plan. That may be because members of staff who were trained in MARQUE techniques had left.

Many interventions have been designed to improve dementia care. But long-term assessments are rare. Most studies look at the effects of an intervention within a year. That may not be long enough to embed improvements in a care home’s culture.

This is a small study, but it suggests the MARQUE programme could be rolled out more widely.”

To read more click here

Funding: This research was co-funded by the NIHR and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). The two year follow study was funded by the NIHR ARC North Thames